You’re invited to Shine a Light on Road Safety

rtssv_shinealightonroadsafety_newsletter

“To complete this walk, surrounded by people who understand the impacts of road trauma, was very powerful. People talked, cried and laughed together and were united in the ambition to make a difference. I think this is a community of people who will continue to come together each year in support of this event and, who will ultimately help influence change for Victoria’s road users.”

When: Sunday 5 May 2019. Entertainment starts at 11 am, walk from 11.30 am and lunch from 12 to 1.30 pm.

Where: Palms Lawn, Albert Park Lake (between the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre and The Point Restaurant)

Distance: 2km or 5km route. Or just sit back in the marquee seating and enjoy a coffee and chat.

The walk: Wheelchair, mobility scooter and prams accessible. Dogs on a lead are welcome.

Food: Water, coffee, snacks and a sausage sizzle BBQ on site.

Cost: $15 individual, $20 family and $50 team

REGISTER NOW

Helping when someone you know has experienced road trauma

The impact of a traumatic event affects individuals in a variety of ways. Some of the symptoms can be extremely difficult to manage. If someone you care about is experiencing the after-effects of trauma, there are some things you can do to help.

Spending time with them will help them to stay connected. This is extremely important and aids in their recovery.

Listening without offering advice. Allow the person to talk about how they feel. Feelings are natural and normal.

Resist the urge to “fix it”.

Recovery takes time and offering a safe place for them to express how they feel can really help their recovery process.

Offer reassurance that they are safe. Trauma undermines our ability to feel safe in the world.

Encourage the person to ask for help and support. Where possible, offer practical assistance with day-to-day tasks such as cooking or picking up children.

There is no set time for the recovery of trauma. There is usually a natural recovery that occurs after trauma. For some people that can be a slow process and can take months or even years.

First on scene and witnesses of road trauma

If you have witnessed or given assistance at the scene of a serious road incident, it is important to be aware of the range of feelings, thoughts and responses you may have. Individuals may have reactions that may be hard to manage and confusing for them and those that are close to them.

Common reactions include flashbacks, sleeplessness, uncomfortable physical sensations and symptoms, social withdrawal, irritability, and strong emotions such as anger or guilt – just to name a few.

These are all normal human responses to a traumatic event, and there is usually a natural recovery that occurs over time. However, for some people that can be a slow process and can take months or even years.

It is important to seek support from family and friends who are able to listen without trying to fix it. If you find yourself alone, or your symptoms persist, it can be helpful to speak to a professional such as your GP, a counsellor, psychologist or a social worker.

Trauma and children

When a child experiences trauma, their age and level of maturity can influence how they react. Some children find it hard to understand their feelings and struggle to verbalise them. Despite the difference in their ability to describe what they are experiencing, children can be affected by the same range of reactions an adult experiences following a traumatic event.

A child’s age impacts on the way they express their distress and what they may need to recover. There are some signs to look out for in children who may be having difficulties but do not necessarily lead to long-term problems. Most are normal and will resolve in time with the help of caring family members and friends.

Some of the signs to watch for include:
• Reliving the trauma through dreams, play, preoccupation with traumatic events
• Distress when reminded of the traumatic event
• Disorganised or agitated behaviour
• Avoiding reminders
• Withdrawal from people
• Losing interest in significant activities
• Over alert – hypervigilance
• Sleep trouble
• Unusually clingy
• Physical discomfort
• Changes in behaviour eg. regression

HOW TO HELP
It’s important to recognise that the child’s behaviour may be a response to the trauma. Reassure the child that they are safe. Have open honest communication about the experience, including both talking and listening. Give the child special attention and allow them to express their emotions. Offer comfort when they are distressed. Correct any misunderstandings or unwarranted fears.

Give clear honest information in an age-appropriate way. Encourage enjoyable activities and have quality family time together. Maintain routine where possible. Using creative practices such as drawing or writing about the experience helps children to understand and process their feelings. Using play for young children is another way to help them communicate and process what they are feeling. Normalise any emotions they experience.

WHEN TO GET PROFESSIONAL HELP
If the reactions described in this post are severe or continue for an extended period, the child could be experiencing a more serious reaction and may need professional help. Contacting a health practitioner is also recommended if a child is experiencing:
• Severe and continued sleep disturbance
• Severe anxiety when separated from loved ones
• Continued fears about things which may remind the child of the trauma
• Behaviour problems at home or school
• Self-doubts, withdrawal or other significant changes in emotions or personality
• A return to ‘babyish’ behaviour that the child had outgrown
• Intense and ongoing emotional upset
• Substance use, dangerous or risk-taking behaviours.

We offer free state-wide professional counselling to anyone impacted by road trauma and are open Monday to Friday between 9 am and 5 pm. To make an appointment call 1300 367 797.

Bernadette Nugent is appointed as interim Chief Executive Officer

As you may know, Cameron Sinclair, who was CEO of Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV) for more than six years finished on 31 December 2018. Due to the holiday period, the search for a new CEO is still in progress.

We are pleased to announce the appointment of Bernadette Nugent, currently RTSSV’s Manager of Counselling and Support Services, to the position of Interim Chief Executive Officer, effective immediately. Bernadette joined RTSSV in 2012 and has had more than 30 years’ experience working with families in a variety of settings with a focus on grief and trauma.

Bernadette is passionate about not-for-profit organisations and about offering quality programs and services that are relevant, accessible and responsive to the needs of the community they serve. She brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to the role and will guide RTSSV during this transitional period with the assistance of the Board.

Current counsellors, Connie Ogan and Jane Phillips will be sharing the Counselling and Support Services Manager role.

We thank Cameron for his great contribution to RTSSV for the past six and half years, he has driven a positive transformation within the organisation and leaves us in a stable financial position from which we can continue in our long-term growth.

Bernadette is very much looking forward to working with our dedicated team of volunteers, staff and stakeholders and continue our work in reducing the incidence and impact of road trauma.

The Board will continue the search for a permanent Chief Executive Officer.

Michael Lombard Honorary Life Membership

As a lawyer working with people who had sustained terrible and often lifelong injuries in road crashes, Michael identified the need for people to be emotionally supported in their journeys of grief and trauma.

During his involvement with, and participation in the initial committee which was to become Road Trauma Support Team, he offered his expertise in law to assist the program in its early incarnation. Hence the Befriender Program, and ultimately Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV) was born.

He dedicated the following decade to the fledgling committee and organization, ensuring its financial survival. Of particular note was his participation in the Rose Weekend, a fundraising initiative that was instrumental in the early successes of the organisation. Later his astute business acumen and savvy professional connections were once again instrumental in creating a philosophically aligned relationship with the Transport Accident Commission, a relationship that continues 19 years after inception.

His support of our work has, as recently as this year, continued to provide opportunities for us, ultimately for the benefit of Victorians impacted by road trauma.

And so, after 24 years of friendship, support, guidance and dogged determination, it is our privilege and pleasure to admit Michael Lombard (pictured below with CEO, Cameron Sinclair) to Honorary Life Membership with RTSSV.

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Chris and Kate Parkin Honorary Life Membership

Commencing their journey with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV) in 2003 when, three years after commencing their careers as paramedics with Ambulance Victoria (then Metropolitan Ambulance Service), they responded to an article calling for volunteer speakers in our Road Trauma Awareness Seminar program.

During their early careers, they had witnessed road trauma on many occasions and had key learnings they wanted to share to make a positive difference to the attitudes and behaviours of drivers charged with driving offences. In their words, they learned that:

  • Road trauma is mostly avoidable
  • Road trauma incidents are largely due to people’s poor choices and
  • That the devastation road trauma causes also has impacts on our emergency services personnel and first responders

Their experiences in assisting people directly impacted by road trauma have informed their work with RTSSV and their innate generosity and compassion led them to continue to both positively influence driver behaviour, and also offer much needed and invaluable peer support to other volunteer speakers who are also impacted by road trauma.

Whilst they have stated in this year’s annual report that they are inspired by the resilience and courage of our volunteer speakers, it is us who are inspired by their generosity and commitment since 2004 to our organisation and road safety.

It is our privilege and pleasure to admit RTSSV’s first-ever husband and wife team to Honorary Life Membership, Kate Drain-Parkin and Chris Parkin (pictured below with CEO, Cameron Sinclair).

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Education team meeting 2018

On Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 of July, we held our state education team weekend at the Iluka Retreat and Camp, Red Hill South.

Thank you to a great team for making the weekend a great success.

Melton Community Road Safety Forum

Thursday 30 August 2018 starting at 6:15 pm – 9.00 pm
31 McKenzie Street, Melton

Are you a young adult driver or the parent of a young adult driver? Don’t miss this FREE forum and your chance to improve your understanding of road safety.

Learn more about road rules and the effects of road trauma including serious injury and fatal collisions. The forum aims to teach residents more about road rules and the effects of road trauma. Guest speakers will share insights into their experiences of dealing with the effects of road collisions. The event will have guest speakers, brochures and showbags with educational material, providing plenty of information on road safety.

All residents are encouraged to attend, especially teenage drivers and their parents.

You can register or find out more information here>> https://bit.ly/2v8YVfB

 

Teenage Road Information Program

7pm Wednesday 1 August 2018
Heritage Funeral Home
1414 Healesville KooWeeRup Road 
Woori Yallock
Doors will be open from 6.30pm onwards.

The presentation provides an in-depth insight into what happens in a road crash and the resulting road trauma. The impacts are real and devastating for emergency services, witnesses, work colleagues, friends and family members.

This program is for young people learning to drive, those who are on their P’s or those who have been driving for years.

Please come and support this important community initiative from the Yarra Valley Emergency Services who would rather meet you at a presentation than meet you at a crash.

Find out more information here>> Yarra Valley TRIP

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